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Oracle Therapeutic Learning System Records Effectiveness of COVID-19 Drugs

Wed, 2020-04-01 11:18
Press Release
Oracle Therapeutic Learning System Records Effectiveness of COVID-19 Drugs

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Apr 1, 2020

For the last several weeks, Oracle has been actively engaged in the ongoing fight against COVID-19. Our primary goal has been to develop and deploy a series of cloud applications that will gather the data necessary to enable health professionals to answer one critical question: What drugs are effective in treating or preventing the COVID-19 virus?

Clinical Trials System

The first systems we implemented in pursuit of this goal were clinical trials. Oracle has long been one of the world’s leading suppliers of clinical trial systems. Over the years, many drugs including the remarkable cancer drug Keytruda have been approved by regulators worldwide after Oracle Clinical Trial Systems collected the data that proved the drug was both safe and effective. As of today, the Oracle Cloud is running clinical trials to test the safety and effectiveness of dozens of different COVID-19 drugs and vaccines. These trials span many countries and hundreds of institutional sites. Our newest cloud system named Clinical One enables institutions to start-up a clinical trial in as little as two weeks…much much quicker than ever before.

Therapeutic Learning System

In addition to gathering data from COVID-19 clinical trials, Oracle has built and donated to the US government a COVID-19 Therapeutic Learning System that allows physicians and patients to record the effectiveness of promising COVID-19 drug therapies. These drugs, like Hydroxychloroquine, Remdesivir, and Kaletra, have been safely used to treat other diseases but are not yet definitively proven to be effective against COVID-19. Physicians are now routinely prescribing these drugs to treat COVID-19 patients. The Oracle Therapeutic Learning System lets the physician record the patient's daily progress. By collecting this real-world patient data throughout the United States now, and throughout the world soon thereafter, we will quickly discover which of the new drugs are most effective against COVID-19, their optimal dosages, and how early in the disease progression the drugs need to be administered. In this way, each patient will participate in the fight against this deadly virus.

The Therapeutic Learning System was the result of a unique and important collaboration with the National Institute of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Doctors and patients started enrolling in the Therapeutic Learning System yesterday. The system is currently available to every physician in the United States at covid19.oracle.com

Contact Info
Jessica Moore
Oracle Corporate Communications
+1.650.506.3297
jessica.moore@oracle.com
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Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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Jessica Moore

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Oracle Offers Free HR Tool to Help Customers Keep Employees Safe

Tue, 2020-03-31 08:00
Blog
Oracle Offers Free HR Tool to Help Customers Keep Employees Safe

By Gretchen Alarcon, Oracle—Mar 31, 2020

As we continue to face increasing concerns about COVID-19, many organizations and HR professionals are facing new and unprecedented challenges.

In an effort to help, we are providing free access to our Workforce Health and Safety solution to current Oracle Human Capital Management Cloud customers. This module will help our customers manage key workplace health and safety issues and answer critical response questions, including:

  • Who in my organization has been exposed to the virus?
  • Have the communal areas of the buildings been appropriately cleaned?
  • Do we have adequate supplies for cleaning and for protecting staff?
  • How do I reach staff to let them know an incident has occurred?
  • Do I need to notify local public health authorities? What data should I share?
  • How can I be sure we have followed up on an incident, and implemented corrective action?
 

Employees can access this information wherever and however they need—from mobile to desktop devices—and we think of this module as an “incident response button”. It provides HR professionals and managers with a number of ways to help take the necessary actions to help keep employees safe.

For instance, as a manager, I typically know what to do when someone calls in sick. But under the current circumstances, once I’ve helped that individual, I also have to think about what I need to do to protect his/her coworkers and the company as a whole.

Our Workforce Health and Safety module helps automate reporting of workplace incidents both now and in the future, as we adapt to heightened health and safety concerns. For example, consider the task of reporting when a conference room hasn’t been cleaned overnight. Under ordinary circumstances, such an incident might not be a top priority, but under the current circumstances, it’s critically important for it to be reported and for action to be taken immediately.

Once an employee or HR manager reports an incident, the system immediately routes the incident to whoever is assigned to remediate it and act. It also sends an email confirmation to the employee who reported the incident, noting the report has been received and is being acted upon.

In addition to providing an easy, effective, and confidential process for handling health and safety matters, our Workforce Health and Safety module also gives reassurance that reports are being appropriately acted upon.

At Oracle, we are committed to helping our customers get up to speed with Workforce Health and Safety as quickly as possible. We will be providing a white paper with step-by-step instructions for configuring basic incident reporting and will also hold virtual “office hours” through the end of April to assist with configuration.

During this time of unprecedented uncertainty, we want to do everything possible to help and we want you to know that you can continue to count on us to support your changing business needs.  

Other Resources

Customers can download and modify sample reports from Customer Connect:  https://cloudcustomerconnect.oracle.com/posts/ab7d3058b0

CDC: Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/guidance-business-response.html

OSHA: 10 Ways to Get Your Safety Program Started https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/ten-easy-things.html

OSHA: Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/worker-participation.html

Workforce Health & Safety Cloud Service Documentation https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/human-resources/20a/fawhs/index.html

Gretchen Alarcon is group vice president for Oracle’s human capital management strategy.

Oracle Ramps Up Free Online Learning and Certifications for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Oracle Autonomous Database

Mon, 2020-03-30 12:00
Blog
Oracle Ramps Up Free Online Learning and Certifications for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Oracle Autonomous Database

By Raghu Viswanathan, Vice President of Education Products and Delivery, Oracle University—Mar 30, 2020

Juergen LindnerI’m happy to announce that Oracle is offering free access to online learning content and certifications for a broad array of users for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Oracle Autonomous Database. This program kicks off on Monday, March 30, 2020, and will be available until May 15, 2020.

Starting now, any user, including developers, technical professionals, architects, students and professors, will have quick and easy access to more than 50 hours of online training and 6 certification exams.

Oracle University will provide users with free access to an extensive library of materials for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Oracle Autonomous Database, as well as content related to topics such as data science, machine learning, and multi-cloud environments such as integration with Microsoft Azure.

We’re making high-quality videos, access to subject matter experts, and recorded demos of hands-on labs available anywhere, anytime so IT pros can accelerate their learning and gain highly sought-after skills. Machine translation (sub-titles only) will also be available for Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, and Spanish speaking countries for all the videos.

As our customers adapt to a rapidly evolving digital landscape, Oracle is stepping up its efforts to help build critical technical cloud skills they need to ramp up innovation. We believe that certifications help professionals develop in-demand skills, shorten turnaround times for customer projects, enhance their expertise and advance their careers, while improving their overall job performance. 

Start learning and get certified in three easy steps:

Step 1: Get a free Oracle Single-Sign-On (SSO) account. If you have an SSO, skip to Step 2

  • Click on Hello. Log In. (See far right corner of the page).
  • Select “Create an account” and fill in the required fields.
  • Verify account via email.
 

Step 2: Access learning paths through the links below:

 

Step 3: Register and take your free certification exam. If you have a PearsonVue account, log in.

  • If not, choose “Create a web account” on the right side of the page and follow instructions.
 

This initiative builds on a recent Oracle announcement of free training resources for cloud developers. Learn more about Oracle University and other training available.

Raghu Viswanathan is Vice President of Education Products and Delivery for Oracle University. He joined Oracle as a software engineer in 1990 and led Operations, Marketing and Sales Readiness before taking on his current role overseeing all Content, Delivery, Certification, Renewals, IT, and Development.

Oracle Continues to Invest in Canada; Opens Second Canadian Cloud Region in Montreal

Mon, 2020-03-30 07:00
Press Release
Oracle Continues to Invest in Canada; Opens Second Canadian Cloud Region in Montreal Unique dual region strategy helps organizations with disaster recovery and compliance requirements

Montreal—Mar 30, 2020

To support growing customer demand for enterprise cloud services in Canada, Oracle today announced a new Gen 2 Cloud region in Montreal. This follows the launch of its Toronto Cloud region last year, making Canada Oracle’s latest country offering dual cloud regions. The opening is part of Oracle’s global plans to operate 36 Generation 2 Cloud regions by the end of 2020. Now, Canadian customers and partners will have access to all Oracle Cloud services, including Oracle Autonomous Database and Oracle Autonomous Linux, as well as Oracle Cloud Applications, to unlock innovation and drive business growth.

Oracle’s unique dual region strategy enables customers to deploy resilient applications in multiple independent cloud regions for disaster recovery—without having sensitive data leave the country that could create issues with regulatory requirements around data sovereignty as well as operational issues associated with operating in multiple countries. 

Oracle continues to make significant investments in Canada to support a fast growing number of customers and partners. Today’s news follows the recent announcement that Oracle and Microsoft expanded their cloud interoperability partnership to help joint customers worldwide run their mission-critical workloads across Oracle Cloud and Microsoft Azure. The Interconnect location in Canada means enterprises can now build workloads that seamlessly interoperate between Microsoft and Oracle cloud regions in Canada.

“Oracle’s Canadian customers and partners are at the forefront of cloud innovation. Our investment in the region reflects unparalleled demand for our Gen 2 Cloud, built to run customers’ most important business applications securely,” said Don Johnson, executive vice president, product development, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. “The new Montreal Region coupled with the Toronto Region enables Oracle to provide multi-region deployments in country to address Canadian organizations’ disaster recovery and compliance requirements.”

In addition to the Montreal cloud region, Oracle recently announced the opening of four Gen 2 Cloud Regions in Melbourne (Australia), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia), Osaka (Japan) and Amsterdam (the Netherlands). Oracle has now opened 17 Gen 2 Cloud regions in the past year and currently operates 21 regions globally—16 commercial and five government—the fastest expansion by any major cloud provider. By the end of this year, the company plans to open additional new cloud regions in the US (San Jose, CA), Brazil (Vinhedo), the UK (Newport, Wales), India (Hyderabad), South Korea (Chuncheon), Singapore, Israel, South Africa, Chile (Santiago), Saudi Arabia and two in the United Arab Emirates.

Currently available Oracle Gen 2 Cloud regions include:

  • Asia Pacific: Tokyo, Osaka, Seoul, Mumbai, Sydney, Melbourne
  • Americas: Phoenix, Ashburn, Toronto, Sao Paolo, Montreal
  • Europe: Frankfurt, London, Zurich, Amsterdam
  • Middle East: Jeddah
  • Government: two general U.S. Government regions, three U.S. Department of Defense specific Government regions

Oracle’s Gen 2 Cloud

Oracle’s modern, second-generation cloud is built and optimized specifically to help enterprises run their most demanding workloads securely. With unique architecture and capabilities, Oracle Cloud delivers unmatched security, performance, and cost savings. Oracle’s Generation 2 Cloud is the only one built to run autonomous services, including Oracle Autonomous Linux and Oracle Autonomous Database, the industry's first and only self-driving database. Oracle Cloud offers a comprehensive cloud computing portfolio, from application development and business analytics to data management, integration, security, artificial intelligence (AI), and blockchain.

Oracle recently introduced Oracle Cloud Free Tier, Always Free services for anyone to try the world’s first self-driving database and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure for an unlimited time. Now, organizations large and small, developers, students, and educators can build, learn, and explore the full functionality of Oracle Autonomous Database and Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, including Compute VMs, Block and Object Storage, and Load Balancer—all of the essentials for developers to build complete applications on Oracle Cloud. 

Canadian Customers and Partners Ready for New Oracle Montreal Cloud Region

Organizations across Canada are using Oracle to run their mission-critical workloads.

Groupe Dynamite is a global fashion retailer with two brands at the heart of its success, Garage and Dynamite. They operate more than 350 stores throughout Canada and 32 in the United States, and employ over 5,000 people. The company chose Oracle Cloud to support enterprise mission-critical workloads so they can continue as a leader among international brands.

“Groupe Dynamite is happy to see that Oracle is investing in Canada with a second cloud region in Montreal. This will enable us to centralize our critical workloads in the two Canadian cloud regions in the near future,” said Daniel Marcotte, Senior IT Director at Groupe Dynamite. “It is critical to maintain 100 percent uptime with cloud vendors and this new data center in Montreal will offer us that possibility without forcing us to store sensitive data outside of Canada.”

Combining career and professional skills training with theoretical knowledge, Seneca provides a polytechnic education to 30,000 full-time and 60,000 part-time students. With campuses in Toronto, York Region and Peterborough and education partners around the world, Seneca offers degrees, graduate certificates, diplomas and certificates in more than 300 full-time, part-time and online programs.

“Seneca College delivers world class post secondary education to Canadian and International students. Ensuring we achieve maximum availability is essential to our overall mission as a leading educational institution,” said Radha Krishnan, Chief Information Officer, Seneca College. “We are excited to have Oracle launch its Montreal Cloud region, as it will give us the ability to build a highly available multi-region application deployment in Canada that will help us best serve our students and other stakeholders.”

Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) is Oracle's partner program that provides partners with a differentiated advantage to develop, sell and implement Oracle solutions. OPN offers resources to train and support specialized knowledge of Oracle’s products and solutions and has evolved to recognize Oracle’s growing product portfolio, partner base and business opportunity. Key to the latest enhancements to OPN is the ability for partners to be recognized and rewarded for their investment in Oracle Cloud. Partners engaging with Oracle will be able to differentiate their Oracle Cloud expertise and success with customers through the OPN Cloud program—an innovative program that complements existing OPN program levels with tiers of recognition and progressive benefits for partners working with Oracle Cloud.

Investing in Canada

Oracle is investing in the skill set in Canada through Oracle University. Oracle University is the trusted provider of Oracle Cloud and on-premise software training and certification. All training is delivered by Oracle’s elite global team of experts and is made available in multiple learning formats for anytime, anywhere training.

In addition, Oracle is supporting the next wave of entrepreneurs via its Oracle for Startups program which is a unique acceleration program that enables mutually beneficial business-building partnerships for startups, our customers, and Oracle. The program creates a virtuous cycle of innovation by blending startup ingenuity with enterprise resources to deliver transformative solutions to customers. It starts with free cloud and expands to a rich collaboration with opportunities to engage with Oracle’s vast network of mentors, product experts, and customers.

Contact Info
Nicole Maloney
Oracle PR
+1.650.506.0806
nicole.maloney@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Nicole Maloney

  • +1.650.506.0806

Oracle Announces Java 14

Tue, 2020-03-17 12:15
Press Release
Oracle Announces Java 14 Oracle JDK 14 represents more than two years of on-time six-month feature releases, bringing innovation and predictability to developers Oracle JDK 14 adds new features to improve developer productivity, including Java language support for switch expressions, new APIs for continuous monitoring of JDK Flight Recorder data, and extended availability of the low-latency Z Garbage Collector to macOS and Windows This new release includes three preview features: Pattern Matching for instanceof (JEP 305), Records (JEP 359) and Text Blocks (JEP 368)

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Mar 17, 2020

Oracle today announced the general availability of Java 14 (Oracle JDK 14). Java 14 continues Oracle’s commitment to accelerate innovation by delivering new enhancements to enterprises and the developer community with a new feature release every six months. The latest Java Development Kit (JDK) delivers new features, including two new highly anticipated preview features – Pattern Matching for instanceof (JEP 305) and Records (JEP 359), as well as a second preview of Text Blocks (JEP 368). Additionally, the latest Java release adds Java language support for switch expressions, exposes new APIs for continuous monitoring of JDK Flight Recorder data, extends the availability of the low-latency Z Garbage Collector to macOS and Windows, and adds, in incubator modules, the packaging of self-contained Java applications and a new Foreign memory access API for safe, efficient access to memory outside of the Java heap.

“Java 14 is further validation of the benefits of the six-month release cadence, giving developers access to features that they would otherwise be waiting years to get their hands on,” said Georges Saab, vice president of development, Java Platform, Oracle. “Not only does JDK 14 have a number of enhancements that will improve developer productivity, but we’re also seeing the first major content to come from projects like Project Panama, with a Foreign-Memory Access API enhancement (JEP 370), and continuing improvements from Project Amber, with Pattern Matching (JEP 305) and Records (JEP 359). These significant enhancements are testament to all of the hard work in these groundbreaking projects.”

The Java 14 release is the result of industry-wide development involving open review, weekly builds, and extensive collaboration between Oracle engineers and members of the worldwide Java developer community via the OpenJDK Community and the Java Community Process. The new features delivered in Java 14 include:

  • JEP 305: Pattern Matching for instanceof (Preview) – This preview feature enhances Java with pattern matching for the instanceof operator. This improves developer productivity by eliminating the need for common boiler plate code and allows more concise type-safe code.

  • JEP 343: Packaging Tool (Incubator) – Provides a way for developers to package Java applications for distribution in platform-specific formats. This helps developers with modern applications where constraints require runtimes and applications to be bundled in a single deliverable. This tools is introduced in an incubator module, which is a way of putting non-final APIs and non-final tools in the hands of developers to get their feedback while the APIs/tools progress towards either finalization or removal in a future release.

  • JEP 345: NUMA-Aware Memory Allocation for G1 – Improves overall performance of the G1 garbage collector on non-uniform memory access (NUMA) systems.

  • JEP 349: JFR Event Streaming – Exposes JDK Flight Recorder (JFR) data for continuous monitoring. This will simplify access to JFR data for various tools and applications and spur further innovation.

  • JEP 352: Non-Volatile Mapped Byte Buffers – Adds a file mapping mode for the JDK when using non-volatile memory. The persistent nature of non-volatile memory changes various persistence and performance assumptions which are leveraged with this feature.

  • JEP 358: Helpful NullPointerExceptions – Improves the usability of NullPointerExceptions by describing precisely which variable was null and other helpful information. This will increase developer productivity and improve the quality of many development and debugging tools.

  • JEP 359: Records (Preview) – This preview feature provides a compact syntax for declaring classes which hold shallowly immutable data. This feature can greatly reduce boilerplate code in classes of this type, but the biggest benefit allowing the modeling of data as data. It should be easy, clear and concise to declare these shallowly-immutable nominal data aggregates.

  • JEP 361: Switch Expressions (Standard) – This was a preview feature in JDK 12 and JDK 13 and is now being added as a standard feature. It allows switch to be used as either a statement or an expression. This feature simplifies every day coding and prepared the way for the pattern matching (JEP 305) feature previewed in this release.

  • JEP 364: ZGC on macOS and JEP 365: ZGC on Windows – While most users that require ZGC also require the scalability of Linux-based environments, there are often needs for deployment and testing to support ZGC on macOS and Windows. There are also certain desktop applications targeting Windows and macOS which will benefit from ZGC.

  • 368: Text Blocks (Second Preview) – After receiving end-user feedback when Text Blocks was first introduced as a preview feature as part of Java 13, enhancements have been added and Text Blocks is being offered as a preview feature again in Java 14 with the goal of becoming standard in a future JDK release. Text Blocks make it easy to express strings that span several lines of source code. It enhances the readability of strings in Java programs that denote code written in non-Java languages; It supports the migration from string literals by stipulating that any new construct can express the same set of strings as a string literal, interpret the same escape sequences and be manipulated in the same ways as a string literal.

  • 370: Foreign-Memory Access API (Incubator) – An API to allow Java programs to safely and efficiently access foreign memory outside of the Java heap.

For users and enterprises seeking commercial support, Oracle also offers the Oracle Java SE Subscription, a low cost and predictable support solution.  This offering is currently used by thousands of large and small organizations globally who receive the Java SE license, and comprehensive support, for the systems they need, and only for as long as they need it. These customers benefit from the flexibility and regular access to tested and certified performance, stability, and security updates for supported releases directly from Oracle.

Java continues to be the #1 programming language preferred by software developers. And as the on-time delivery of innovations with Java 14 demonstrates, through thoughtful planning and ecosystem involvement, the Java platform continues to power modern application development.

Contact Info
Travis Anderson
Oracle
208.880.8134
travis.j.anderson@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Future Product Disclaimer

The preceding is intended to outline our general product direction. It is intended for information purposes only, and may not be incorporated into any contract. It is not a commitment to deliver any material, code, or functionality, and should not be relied upon in making purchasing decisions. The development, release, timing, and pricing of any features or functionality described for Oracle’s products may change and remains at the sole discretion of Oracle Corporation.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Travis Anderson

  • 208.880.8134

Women’s History Month 2020 at Oracle: Christina Cavanna on Trust and Community

Tue, 2020-03-17 10:18
Blog
Women’s History Month 2020 at Oracle: Christina Cavanna on Trust and Community

By Oracle—Mar 17, 2020

This month at Oracle we’re celebrating the women who have shaped our lives, our communities, our workplaces, our neighborhoods, and our society. Hear from our employees, partners, and customers and share your own story on social media by using the #HerStory hashtag and tagging @Oracle.

Christina Cavanna is Vice President of Global Marketing Operations and Chief of Staff. She’s a seasoned marketing leader and Oracle veteran—and also a mentor and a mother.

Tell us about your job. What do you love about what you do?

My favorite thing about my job is being able to show significant impact. I love working in areas that add real value to the business. With marketing, I know you can add real value to the company when you’re successfully connected to the overall business strategy. And I get to work with smart people every day who love a challenge.

Tell us a little bit about life outside of the office.   

I hang out with my family, I love to be at the beach, and sometimes I break out a puzzle.

Why is Oracle a great place to work?

Something that makes Oracle unique is the size of our business. This means there’s always an opportunity to try something new—whether that’s a different role, area of the business, or set of skills. If you’re starting to get antsy in a job because you feel you’ve learned it, it’s time to move forward and Oracle always supports that. My favorite part of working at Oracle, however, is the people—getting to work on teams to solve big challenges with smart people who are kind and respectful.

Who has inspired you on your journey, both professionally and personally?

For me, it’s a group of women I call my “neighborhood moms.” I grew up in a town about 50 miles east of where we are at Oracle HQ in Redwood Shores, Calif. This was a different time, when people really didn’t move around much. You grew up alongside the same families. There were six moms who all lived on Tyler Avenue, and together they were a force. They each had such different life experiences. One was a small business owner, another a pilot, another built their own home. Together, they built a beautiful, lasting community from scratch—one where we felt really supported, loved, and optimistic, like the world was our oyster.

What did you learn from the “neighborhood moms”?

The neighborhood moms really instilled in me the meaning of trust, which is about both supporting and leaning on others. Because I grew up on this block, in this community that these women fostered, I really seek out communities that are similar. Even in a workplace environment, I look for people who are open and who are kind, where I know I can trust and be trusted.

The theme for International Women's Day is, “Let’s all be each for equal,” a call to create a more gender-balanced world. What does this mean to you?

Of course, “each for equal” means the big things we as a society still need to work on—like equal pay and representation. Beyond that, for me personally it means a culture of respect and awareness, where you are heard and valued based on merit and not on gender. There are no more excuses for keeping women from having a seat at the table. We have a long way to go, and we each need to work towards a more equitable society.

What are your hopes for the next generation?

When I think about my nieces, I hope that they can be themselves without giving a second thought to their behavior because of their gender. I hope they never feel that tug of second-guessing or filtering their opinion because they worry about perception. Also, I hope that we don’t need to enforce or legislate equality because the business, societal, and cultural value of gender-equity is a given or an assumption. We don’t need to explain it!

If you could share only one bit of advice to your younger self, what would it be?

Your career is about people. Build your network and nurture it! If you see someone doing something that you admire, that interests you—ask them about it. Choose jobs based on the managers and the team, not just the position.

What advice do you have for women who are just starting their careers?

Set goals for the long term and share them with your managers or mentors for accountability. Career conversations shouldn’t be about how to get to the next level—they should be about how you’re moving towards your long-term mission. Going with the flow doesn’t always work. You’ve got to define your own pace and path.

If you’d like to learn more about how Oracle women lead the way at work and in the world, visit Women at Oracle online. You can also view our diversity and inclusion community.

Oracle Cloud Powers New Video, Gaming, and Sports Streaming Services

Tue, 2020-03-17 07:00
Press Release
Oracle Cloud Powers New Video, Gaming, and Sports Streaming Services Leading content streaming companies turn to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure to enable fast digital storage, retrieval, and delivery to meet growing global demand

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Mar 17, 2020

As live streaming continues to represent a huge portion of all internet traffic, leading content providers—Phenix, Net Insight, and Mynet Inc.,—have selected Oracle Cloud Infrastructure to support growing global demand for streaming content. 

According to Go-Globe, live streaming is expected to account for 82 percent of all internet traffic this year, and the leading global providers of streaming content all have one thing in common: they need infrastructure to securely store and quickly access huge catalogs of digital content. As the popularity of streaming content continues to grow, providers are looking for technology partners to support their global growth and massive data demands.  

“Oracle’s modern, second-generation cloud is built and optimized to help enterprises run their most demanding workloads, including digital content, swiftly and securely,” said Vinay Kumar, vice president of product management at Oracle. “We architected our cloud specifically for low latency and high, consistent performance, making it an ideal platform for live streaming. We are seeing companies around the globe take advantage of our unique architecture and low networking costs to reach their customers in real time.”

Phenix

During commercial breaks at last year’s Oscars, Phenix provided the real-time “audience cam” capturing top celebrities in informal moments chatting and socializing amongst themselves via a stream from the Dolby Theater to a global audience watching online. ABC employed Phenix’s high availability workflows including active-active encoding and multi-path ingest over two independent internet connections for the highest reliability. At the peak, Phenix streamed to 110,000 concurrent viewers at a stream join rate of more than 80,000 per second, totaling 1,400,000 viewers with an end-to-end latency of less than 1⁄2 second.

Phenix sought a cloud infrastructure solution that could deliver uninterrupted video streams that are tailored to the internet connection speed and quality of millions of end-user devices. Ultimately Phenix choose Oracle Cloud Infrastructure because of Oracle’s Global enterprise focused presence and exceptional customer service and support. Phenix needed a partner that would provide leading performance for virtual cloud infrastructure and a high degree of transparency.

“Most streaming providers today don’t deliver an optimal user experience due to rebuffering, latency, and audience drift. We rely on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure for rapid scalability when an event suddenly gains thousands of new viewers. Phenix enables users to watch real-time content synchronously regardless of the device, operating system, or network connection quality,” said Dr. Stefan Birrer, Chief Software Architect and co-founder, Phenix. “The Oracle Cloud Infrastructure platform meets our challenging requirements of performance and scale, has increased the efficiency of workloads up to 40 percent and decreased networking costs by 70 percent. This allows us to pass significant savings on to our customers.”

Net Insight

Emmy Award-winning Net Insight facilitates television streaming for the Olympics, Super Bowl, Oscars, and other major live events, and offers people and resource management for TV streaming projects during these events. The company was eager to offer its platform as a service to its customers, but faced a monumental obstacle with more than 20 years of data stored in customer-owned warehouses. 

“We needed a cloud solution that could support our goal of making our platform available as a service, so we could provide our customers with more complete analysis and real insights from all the scheduling data they gather,” said Crister Fritzson, CEO, Net Insight. “The combination of Oracle Autonomous Database and Oracle Analytics Cloud provided the most complete, clean offering on the market. Not only are we able to securely house that 20 years of data, we now have the ability to gain critical business insights from it in real time. In addition to offering a superior solution—no other database self-heals, self-tunes and self-secures—the high level of customer support provided by Oracle played a critical role at every level of the entire project.”

Mynet

Mynet, a game service business that specializes in online game management for over 60 titles since founded, aims to provide gamers with an “exciting space over a longer time.” With a business model based on working with game makers to create a longer life for online titles, Mynet sought an online game operation platform for “Age of Ishtaria,” a beautifully-illustrated, fast-paced, action battle role-playing game (RPG).  

“A stable environment is essential in online game operations, and providing a space where users can enjoy the game over a long period of time is a huge benefit to our customers,” said Mr. Yuki Horikoshi, general manager of engineering, Mynet Inc. “Oracle Cloud Infrastructure was the best balance between performance and cost for ‘Age of Ishtaria,’ enabling players to gain a better user experience while also delivering 65 percent cost savings compared to previous cloud service. Those savings then allow us to reinvest in new events and campaigns for our customers.”  

Oracle’s Gen 2 Cloud

Oracle’s modern, second-generation cloud is built and optimized specifically to help enterprises run their most demanding workloads securely. With unique architecture and capabilities, Oracle Cloud delivers unmatched security, performance, and cost savings. Oracle’s Generation 2 Cloud is the only one built to run autonomous services, including Oracle Autonomous Linux and Oracle Autonomous Database, the industry's first and only self-driving database. Oracle Cloud offers a comprehensive cloud computing portfolio, from application development and business analytics to data management, integration, security, artificial intelligence (AI), and blockchain.

Contact Info
Kaitlin Ambrogio
Oracle PR
+1.781.434.9555
kaitlin.ambrogio@oracle.com
Nicole Maloney
Oracle PR
+1.650.506.0806
nicole.maloney@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

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Oracle Adds Clarity and Color to the De Beers In-Store Experience

Mon, 2020-03-16 08:00
Press Release
Oracle Adds Clarity and Color to the De Beers In-Store Experience Mobile Point of Service allows associates to guide shoppers through their diamond journey anywhere in the store

REDWOOD SHORES, Calif. and LONDON, U.K.—Mar 16, 2020

Luxury retailer De Beers Jewellers is adopting modern Oracle Xstore technology to enhance its customers’ shopping experience. The company prides itself on offering exquisite gifts and peerless diamonds for life’s key moments. Each of its 33 stores, located in 15 countries, are equipped with the proprietary De Beers Iris technology that allows customers to see the unique characteristics of their diamond through the eyes of an expert. With Oracle Mobile Point of Service (POS), De Beers will further improve the in-store experience by empowering associates to engage customers throughout their purchase journey.

“Diamonds are works of art in their own rights with incredible colours, tints, and nuances. The more you know, the more you can discover. Our brand ambassadors guide customers to find the perfect jewellery for their unique tastes,” said Francois Delage, chief executive officer, De Beers Jewelers. “Selecting Oracle’s mobile technology will enable our brand ambassadors to ensure a seamless in store experience from the discovery phase to purchase, in the optimal setting.”

In collaboration with Oracle Retail Consulting Services, De Beers Jewellers will implement Oracle Retail Xstore Point of Service and Oracle Retail Xstore Office Cloud Service. With the offerings, associates will be able to interact with customers in a truly personalized way.

“Oracle Retail Xstore POS enables retailers to pivot to the customer by delivering a fully mobile store with all the capabilities required to create a modern shopping experience,” said Mike Webster, senior vice president and general manager, Oracle Retail. “With Oracle, De Beers associates can focus their attention on showing the uniqueness of their jewellery and the needs of the shoppers from anywhere in the store.”

Oracle Retail Xstore Office Cloud Service can centralize all back-office elements of store operations, eliminating the need for additional data center investment. This cloud service enables faster implementation timelines and creates a more responsive business model attuned to shifts in consumer preferences. Oracle Retail POS and Xstore are architected for global expansion, providing country-pack accelerators that help expedite international rollouts.

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Kris Reeves
Oracle PR
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About Oracle Retail

Oracle is the modern platform for retail. Oracle provides retailers with a complete, open, and integrated platform for best-of-breed business applications, cloud services, and hardware that are engineered to work together. Leading fashion, grocery, and specialty retailers use Oracle solutions to accelerate from best practice to next practice, drive operational agility, and refine the customer experience. For more information, visit our website, www.oracle.com/retail.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

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AEP to Use Oracle for Energy Management Programs

Mon, 2020-03-16 07:00
Press Release
AEP to Use Oracle for Energy Management Programs

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Mar 16, 2020

For 113 years, American Electric Power (AEP) has made modern life possible with the delivery of safe reliable electricity. But the company knows that today’s savvy consumer expects more. They want more insight into the cost and impact of their energy use and advice on how to reduce both. Helping guide customers in this evolving energy journey, AEP has selected Oracle Utilities Opower to deliver tailored energy management programs across its portfolio of utilities.    

“AEP is committed to delivering personalized touchpoints to each customer,” said Scott Neuman, group vice president, Oracle Utilities Opower. “With Opower, AEP will be able to more quickly develop and scale new products and services that engage customers with the right information at the moment they are most likely to act.”

Through Opower’s advanced Home Energy Management programs and insights, AEP Ohio has already engaged its customers via more than 25 million personalized communications, helping them save millions of dollars on their energy bills.

Oracle will provide AEP a single customer experience platform built atop a common, secure data model that spans everything from energy efficiency to digital self-service to device automation. By consolidating nine different vendor solutions with the Opower platform, AEP will be able to enhance the customer journey across its utilities by providing customers:

  • A better understanding of new offerings and rates through high bill alerts, rate comparisons, and easy to use tools for households with smart meters, solar panels, and electric vehicles.
  • The ability to engage through their channels of choice via customized insights embedded into their online account. This includes enhancing AEP’s digital assistant solution through integration with Opower, so customers can ask devices such as Google Home for anything from a forecast of their monthly bill to advice on how to reduce it.
  • Personalized insights via energy reports, online home energy assessments, and peak savings programs.
  • The ability to seamlessly enroll their home devices in utility grid service programs via EnergyHub, allowing utility control in exchange for compelling rebates and incentives.
 

To learn more about Oracle Utilities Opower, please visit here

Contact Info
Kris Reeves
Oracle PR
+1.925.787.6744
kris.reeves@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

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Oracle Announces Fiscal 2020 Third Quarter Financial Results

Thu, 2020-03-12 15:00
Press Release
Oracle Announces Fiscal 2020 Third Quarter Financial Results
  • Q3 FY20 GAAP EPS up 4% to $0.79 and Non-GAAP EPS up 11% to $0.97
  • Total Revenues of $9.8 billion, up 2% year-over-year and 3% in constant currency
  • Cloud Services & License Support Revenues of $6.9 billion, up 4% year-over-year and 5% in constant currency
  • Fusion ERP Cloud Revenues up 37% year-over-year and 38% in constant currency
  • The Board of Directors increased the authorization for share repurchases by $15.0 billion

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Mar 12, 2020

Oracle Corporation (NYSE: ORCL) today announced fiscal 2020 Q3 results. Total Revenues were $9.8 billion, up 2% in USD and 3% in constant currency compared to Q3 last year. Cloud Services and License Support revenues were $6.9 billion, up 4% in USD and 5% in constant currency. Cloud License and On-Premise License revenues were $1.2 billion.

GAAP Operating Income was up 4% to $3.5 billion, and GAAP Operating Margin was 36%. Non-GAAP Operating Income was up 2% to $4.4 billion, and non-GAAP Operating Margin was 44%. GAAP Net Income was $2.6 billion, and non-GAAP Net Income was $3.2 billion. GAAP Earnings Per Share was up 4% to $0.79, while non-GAAP Earnings Per Share was up 11% to $0.97.

Short-term Deferred Revenues were $7.8 billion. Operating Cash Flow was $13.9 billion during the trailing twelve months.

"We had an extremely strong quarter with Total Revenues growing 3% in constant currency,” said Oracle CEO, Safra Catz. “Subscription revenues, made up of Cloud Services and License Support revenues, grew 5% in constant currency. These consistently growing and recurring subscription revenues now account for 71% of total company revenues, thus enabling a sequential increase in our operating margin, and double-digit non-GAAP Earnings Per Share growth in Q3.”

“The Oracle Autonomous Database, the world’s only fully autonomous data management system, can automatically patch security vulnerabilities while running; it keeps your data safe,” said Oracle Chairman and CTO, Larry Ellison. “Oracle Autonomous Database is also both serverless and elastic. It’s the only database that can instantaneously scale itself to an optimal level of CPU and IO resources. You only pay for what you use. Security and economy are two fundamental reasons why thousands of customers are now using the revolutionary new Oracle Autonomous Database in our Generation 2 Public Cloud.”

The Board of Directors increased the authorization for share repurchases by $15.0 billion. The Board of Directors also declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.24 per share of outstanding common stock. This dividend will be paid to stockholders of record as of the close of business on April 9, 2020, with a payment date of April 23, 2020.

Q3 Fiscal 2020 Earnings Conference Call and Webcast

Oracle will hold a conference call and webcast today to discuss these results at 2:00 p.m. Pacific. You may listen to the call by dialing (816) 287-5563, Passcode: 425392. To access the live webcast, please visit the Oracle Investor Relations website at http://www.oracle.com/investor. In addition, Oracle’s Q3 results and fiscal 2020 financial tables are available on the Oracle Investor Relations website.

A replay of the conference call will also be available by dialing (855) 859-2056 or (404) 537-3406, Passcode: 5995463.

Contact Info
Ken Bond
Oracle Investor Relations
+1.650.607.0349
ken.bond@oracle.com
Deborah Hellinger
Oracle Corporate Communciations
+1.212.508.7935
deborah.hellinger@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly-Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE:ORCL), visit us at www.oracle.com or contact Investor Relations at investor_us@oracle.com or (650) 506-4073.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

“Safe Harbor” Statement

Statements in this press release relating to Oracle's future plans, expectations, beliefs, intentions and prospects, including statements regarding the growth of our subscription business and our Autonomous Database business, are "forward-looking statements" and are subject to material risks and uncertainties. Many factors could affect our current expectations and our actual results, and could cause actual results to differ materially. We presently consider the following to be among the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations: (1) Our success depends upon our ability to develop new products and services, integrate acquired products and services and enhance our existing products and services. (2) Our cloud strategy, including our Oracle Software-as-a-Service and Infrastructure-as-a-Service offerings, may adversely affect our revenues and profitability. (3) We might experience significant coding, manufacturing or configuration errors in our cloud, license and hardware offerings. (4) If the security measures for our products and services are compromised and as a result, our customers' data or our IT systems are accessed improperly, made unavailable, or improperly modified, our products and services may be perceived as vulnerable, our brand and reputation could be damaged, the IT services we provide to our customers could be disrupted, and customers may stop using our products and services, all of which could reduce our revenue and earnings, increase our expenses and expose us to legal claims and regulatory actions. (5) Our business practices with respect to data could give rise to operational interruption, liabilities or reputational harm as a result of governmental regulation, legal requirements or industry standards relating to consumer privacy and data protection. (6) Economic, political and market conditions can adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, including our revenue growth and profitability, which in turn could adversely affect our stock price. (7) Our international sales and operations subject us to additional risks that can adversely affect our operating results. (8) Acquisitions present many risks and we may not achieve the financial and strategic goals that were contemplated at the time of a transaction. A detailed discussion of these factors and other risks that affect our business is contained in our SEC filings, including our most recent reports on Form 10-K and Form 10-Q, particularly under the heading "Risk Factors." Copies of these filings are available online from the SEC or by contacting Oracle Corporation's Investor Relations Department at (650) 506-4073 or by clicking on SEC Filings on Oracle’s Investor Relations website at http://www.oracle.com/investor. All information set forth in this press release is current as of March 12, 2020. Oracle undertakes no duty to update any statement in light of new information or future events. 

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Ken Bond

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Deborah Hellinger

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Pay No Attention to That Man Behind the Curtain

Mon, 2020-03-09 09:34
Blog
Pay No Attention to That Man Behind the Curtain

Ken Glueck, Executive Vice President, Oracle—Mar 9, 2020

This past January, Google filed its brief on the merits of its case with the U.S. Supreme Court and sought the support of outside groups to bolster its position. These amicus curiae (friend of the court) briefs create the impression that this case is of great import and controversy, and a ruling in Oracle’s favor will impede innovation. 

Upon closer inspection, what these briefs reveal is a significantly different picture, one where Google is the outlier, with very little meaningful support outside the purview of its financial fingerprints.

As we discussed in a previous post, this case is not about innovation, it is about theft. Google copied verbatim more than 11,000 lines of software code, and now attempts post hoc to change the rules in order to excuse its conduct. Any objective view of technological innovation during the pendency of this matter leads to the conclusion that strong copyright promotes innovation. The Federal Circuit decided in 2014 that Oracle’s Java copyrights were valid and enforceable and the period since 2014 has seen some of the greatest advances in technology.

As those of us that have watched Google over the past few decades know, Google’s view boils down to the self-absorbed position that the work it is doing is of such consequence that the rules shouldn’t apply to them. The problem for Google is that very few outside of its self-generated atmosphere agree. 

Let’s be clear, it is not commonplace or foundational in the software industry to steal other developer’s software code. Rather, what is commonplace is a confluence of interests where code is licensed to facilitate its widespread deployment, with the owner choosing the terms. The more restrictive the terms, the less likely it is to be widely deployed. Copyright licenses are the foundation of open source software as well, with more than two dozen different licenses governing open source technology, some more permissive, some less permissive. Many innovators—including, most notably, Google—use commercial licenses, with a broad range of terms. 

Java embraced choice, with three different licensing alternatives, including a freely deployed open source license, and a commercial license designed to maintain interoperability. And it turns out that nobody except Google found it necessary to steal despite Java’s enormous popularity. It is not in dispute in this matter that Google destroyed Java interoperability so it is unbelievable that many of its amici take the position that Google needs to prevail in order to protect interoperability.

The other theme we see is this idea of a “convenience exception” to copyright. This concept sets up the bizarre sliding scale that the more popular software is the less copyright protection it deserves because copyright is somehow inconvenient. We do not dispute the premise that theft is convenient, but that also turns intellectual property protection on its head. And Google’s argument really boils down to the position that it verbatim copied over 11,000 lines of Java software because it would be more convenient for developers.

As we have stated, Google is an advertising company, think Don Draper, not da Vinci. Its advertising machine feeds off the data and content of others, so copyright is truly anathema to its business model. It has spent the last couple of decades curating an environment to undermine copyright and to advance its advertising interests. And while Google is entitled to its views, its views are primarily that of an advertising company not an innovator.

Google’s self-promoting world view continues to be largely unsuccessful in the policy arena because most policy makers see Google for what it is. In dozens of Congressional hearings since the Copyright Act was expressly amended to include software, we cannot find a single instance where Google’s position in this litigation—parsing some software code which is copyrightable from other code that isn’t—was seriously debated. 

Our own amici, including the recently retired Chairmen of the bicameral Judiciary Committees, state that no proposals to limit copyright protections for software were ever given consideration in Congress. In fact, we are not even sure that in the decade this litigation has been pending Google has even made this argument before Congress. The reason Google fails to make headway is because its position on copyright is anathema to the consensus, and its support is largely manufactured. So, Google now asks the Supreme Court to legislate in order to overcome its failed advocacy and to change the law to provide post hoc justification for its infringement.

Google has mastered the art of curating an atmosphere to support its views, spending well over $100 million over the past decade to create its echo-chamber. While Google’s approach is generally well understood, this case is the first time its artificial ecosystem was brought to bear at the Supreme Court, so we thought a little sunshine would help along the way.

We will admit to surprise when we saw the headline that 26 briefs were filed on Google’s behalf. Google attempted to create a narrative that tech supports Google’s position, and we already made the point that tech is clearly not supporting Google’s views.

From the titles of its briefs, one might also get the impression that there is a broad community of interests supporting Google. Upon closer inspection, it appears that Google’s overall support is far weaker than it appears, and the purported controversy is far less pronounced.

In summary, out of 26 briefs, we found:

  • 7 briefs representing 13 entities that received “substantial contributions” from Google;

  • 8 briefs filed by entities or individuals that have financial ties to Google through grants, dues, cy pres settlement proceeds or employment of individual amici;

  • 2 briefs filed by companies with a clear commercial interest in Google prevailing;

  • 1 brief filed by several former U.S. government employees all of whom worked for a small government agency run by a former Google executive, despite the U.S. government itself filing a brief in favor of Oracle;

  • 4 separate briefs representing a total of 7 individuals;

  • A few other briefs where Google financial ties are likely;

  • 1 brief submitted by a serial copyright infringer repeatedly sanctioned by the Courts;

What masqueraded as a mass show of support for Google, may not be much more than an exercise in transactional interests.

Let’s dig into Google’s 26 briefs.

In a prior post, we discussed the interests of Microsoft and IBM. We pointed out that Microsoft and IBM are commercial competitors with a clear commercial interest in the outcome of this case. We highlighted Microsoft’s efforts to undermine Java, and IBM’s efforts to acquire Java.  We made the point that Microsoft previously filed on Oracle’s behalf on the question of copyrightability. And we pointed out that despite IBM’s vast legal resources, it has been completely silent on this case for a decade until now. Importantly, we made clear that Microsoft and IBM do not speak for tech as evidenced by the deafening silence from Silicon Valley and the fact that not a single brief from the other 98 of the Top 100 tech companies was filed.

That leaves us with 24 other Google amici.

Like many companies, Google publishes a “list of politically-engaged trade associations, independent third-party organizations and other tax-exempt groups that receive the most substantial contributions (emphasis added)” from Google.

So, which of its amici received “the most substantial contributions” from Google?

Brief of Center for Democracy and Technology, et al

According to Google’s transparency page, Google provides “substantial contributions” to all four of the organizations that submitted this brief, including the Institute for Intellectual Property & Social Justice, and the National Consumers League.[1] CDT, in particular, has a “special relationship” with Google; in addition to direct funding, there has been a revolving door between Google and CDT’s employees and “Advisory Council.”[2] Since 2008, CDT has been one of many “public interest” organizations that host “Google Policy Fellows,” undergraduate, graduate and law students paid by Google and deployed in external advocacy groups to work on policy issues important to the company.[3]

Brief of Computer & Communications Industry Association and Internet Association

According to its transparency page, Google provides “substantial contributions” to both the Computer & Communications Industry Association and Internet Association.[4]

Brief of Electronic Frontier Foundation

In 2011, Google gave Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) $1 million as part of the cy pres settlement related to privacy complaints about its Google Buzz app.[5] EFF continues to receive “substantial contributions” from Google,[6] and like CDT, EFF enjoys a “special relationship” with Google involving the EFF Board and Google-tied individuals -- a revolving door with employees. EFF has also utilized Google-funded fellows as employees since 2008.[7]

Brief of The American Library Association, et al

The American Library Association receives “substantial contributions” from Google.[8]

Brief of R Street Institute, et al

All three groups that signed this brief, R Street Institute, Public Knowledge, and Niskanen Center, receive “substantial contributions” from Google.[9] The Niskanen Center disclosed on its website that it received $100,000 from Google in January 2020, the same month the brief was filed.[10]

Brief of Engine Advocacy

Engine Advocacy was created by Google employees working out of the company’s Mountain View, California, headquarters.[11] The group continues to receive “substantial contributions” from Google.[12]

Brief of American Antitrust Institute

According to Google’s transparency page, the American Antitrust Institute receives “substantial contributions” from Google.[13]

So, we have 7 briefs coming from 13 organizations that receive “substantial contributions” from Google.

That brings us to 17 amici remaining.

Brief of Small, Medium, and Open Source Technology Organizations

Google has financial relationships with many of the organizations that signed this brief.  Google paid Mozilla an undisclosed sum—thought to be in the hundreds of millions—to make Google the default search engine in Mozilla’s Firefox browser.[14] Google Ventures was part of a $160 million funding round of Cloudera in 2014.[15] Google provides direct financial support to Creative Commons, the Software Freedom Conservancy, and the Wikimedia Foundation.[16] Open Source Initiative President Molly de Blanc works at the Gnome Foundation, which counts Google as a supporter.[17]

Brief of Python Software Foundation, et al

Both the Python Software Foundation and Tidelift, another signatory to this brief, list Google among their financial sponsors.[18]

Brief of Eighty-Three Computer Scientists

Ten of the amici who signed this brief—Doug Lea, John Ousterhout, Martin Odersky, Andries van Dam, Aviel D. Rubin, David Clark, Jan Vitek, Dan Wallach, David Patterson, Harold “Hal” Abelson—received direct financial support from Google in the form of academic research awards.[19] Another 19 are employed by Google or by organizations that have a financial relationship with Google.

Brief of Seventy-Two Intellectual Property Scholars

Five of the scholars who signed this brief—Anupam Chander, Jorge L. Contreras, Michael A. Carrier, Paul J. Heald, and Peter DiCola—acknowledge financial support from Google in their academic work.[20] Two other signatories, Pamela Samuelson and Jennifer M. Urban, work for academic institutes that have received hundreds of thousands of dollars in financial support from Google through cy pres settlements.[21]

Brief of Software Innovators, Startups, and Investors

Belying its name, this brief is submitted on behalf of two individuals, Esther Dyson and Tim O’Reilly and two entities, Azavea and Foundry Group.

In 2008, amicus Esther Dyson wrote, “I have a complex relationship with Google. I have fed at its trough many times.”[22]

Foundry Group co-founder Brad Feld invested in several companies acquired by Google, and Tim O'Reilly was an early investor in Blogger, which was sold to Google.[23]

Brief of Developers Alliance

Google is a member of the Developers Alliance, which charges dues to its corporate members.[24]

Brief of Professors Peter S. Menell, et al

Professor Menell is the co-founder of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, which received $700,000 in 2012 from Google as part of a cy pres settlement in a lawsuit over privacy complaints related to its Google Buzz app. Google is also a corporate benefactor of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology.[25] Another author of this brief, Shyamkrishna Balganesh, is the co-director of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Technology Innovation & Competition, which receives funding from Google.[26]

Brief of Copyright Scholars

Importantly, these seventeen scholars “express no opinion” on whether the code at issue in this case is copyrightable and limit their input to fair use.

Three signatories to this brief, Patricia Aufderheide, Aram Sinnreich, and Madhavi Sunder, have co-authored papers with individuals who received direct financial support from Google.[27] A fourth signer, Peter Jaszi, is the founder of the Digital Future Coalition, which includes many Google beneficiaries among its members.[28]

And then there were 9 briefs without a known or public financial connection to Google.

Brief of Software and System Developers and Engineers for United States Government Agencies

When the Supreme Court of the United States seeks the views of the Solicitor General with a Call for the Views of the Solicitor General (CVSG), it kicks off an extensive interagency process within the United States Government (USG). Agencies conduct meetings with parties and ultimately make recommendations to the Solicitor General, which are then consolidated and presented as a brief to the Court.

In this matter, twice the Supreme Court issued a CVSG and twice the USG conducted an extensive process and twice, once in 2015 (Obama Administration) and again in 2019 (Trump Administration) the Solicitor General sided with Oracle. This process included all government agencies, but particularly the Copyright Office, the Patent and Trademark Office, the United States Trade Representative, the Federal Trade Commission, the Department of Justice, as well as all government agencies that procure technology. In each case, the views of each of these Departments and Agencies were not controversial and in favor of Oracle.

This brief’s title is highly misleading because it is filed by former representatives of a single government entity, the United States Digital Service (USDS). There is not a single Agency Chief Information Officer or Chief Technology Officer on the brief. And, most importantly, the United States Digital Service is run by long-time Google executive, Matt Cutts, who left Google in 2017.

This group of temporary government employees clearly not representing the U.S. Government makes the remarkable statement that affirming Oracle’s view would “create calamity.”

Brief of the Software Freedom Law Center

Oracle too has supported the Software Freedom Law Center for legal work supporting open source and while we have respect for the work they do, we cannot imagine a scenario where Google is not providing funding.

With eight briefs left we have four briefs representing a total of seven people, and while we fully respect their views, they are essentially seven interested individuals.

Brief of Civ Pro, IP & Legal History Professors

It is title titled “Civ Pro, IP and History professors” because there are only three (3) of them on the brief and only one focused on IP. Another of the professors recently wrote a paper on “How Duncan Kennedy Caught the Hierarchy Zeitgeist but Missed the Point.”

Brief Empirical Legal Researchers

This brief purports to represent two (2) empirical legal researchers.

Brief amici curiae of Michael Risch

Mr. Risch writes on behalf of himself.

Brief amici curiae of Professor Glynn Lunney

Professor Lunney writes on behalf of himself.

We saved the best for last.

Brief amici curiae of Rimini Street, Inc.

The Rimini brief is particularly stunning in that nowhere in the statement of interest of the amici does Rimini bother to mention that it has been repeatedly found in violation of Oracle’s copyrights by court after court.

Rimini engaged in a massive theft of Oracle's IP and tried to cover it up by destroying evidence and engaging in other litigation misconduct to cover up their illegal acts. The Federal District Court made this clear: “Rimini’s business model was built entirely on its infringement of Oracle’s copyrighted software and its improper access and downloading of data from Oracle’s website and computer systems.” Despite efforts by their executives to obfuscate their conduct, Rimini’s illegal activities were repeatedly identified by both judge and jury and are the subject of an ongoing federal criminal investigation. Courts have identified Rimini as a dishonest, serial infringer and have ordered a permanent injuction against Rimini to cease its unlawful conduct, and to pay Oracle nearly $100 million in damages. 

We are not sure Rimini is exactly the character witness Google wants on its side.

So, out of 26 briefs, we are left with 2 which purport to represent a meaningful category of interests without any apparent financial or business connection to Google:

Brief amici curiae of the Retail Litigation Center

Brief amici curia of the Auto Care Association and Static Control Components, Inc.

So we are not accused of throwing stones ourselves, Oracle was incredibly appreciative from the show of support we received from 32 amicus briefs filed on our behalf. As we openly and transparently disclose, Oracle tries to support organizations that share our views. As a result, 6 of the amici who filed on our behalf have received some financial support from Oracle.  However, under no circumstances would we consider that support “substantial” or material, and in no circumstance do we exercise any financial or decision-making control over any of the amici who filed on this matter. And finally, in no circumstance did we request the submitting entity file a brief on our behalf.

[2]  “How Google’s Backing of Backpage Protects Child Sex Trafficking,” by Consumer Watchdog, et al, https://www.consumerwatchdog.org/resources/backpagereport.pdf

[3] Ibid.

[7] “How Google’s Backing of Backpage Protects Child Sex Trafficking,” by Consumer Watchdog, et al, https://www.consumerwatchdog.org/resources/backpagereport.pdf

[22] https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/big-brother-google?

Women’s History Month at Oracle: Leor Chechik on Inclusivity and Engineering

Fri, 2020-03-06 07:00
Blog
Women’s History Month at Oracle: Leor Chechik on Inclusivity and Engineering

By Oracle—Mar 6, 2020

This month at Oracle we’re celebrating the women who have shaped our lives, our communities, our workplaces, our neighborhoods, and our society. Hear from our employees, partners, and customers and share your own story on social media by using the #HerStory hashtag and tagging @Oracle.

Leor Chechik

Leor Chechik is a Director of Technical Programs at Oracle. She is an experienced principal software engineer and a founding member of the Oracle Women Leadership Tech community. Leor is focused on building technical initiatives that encourage underrepresented groups to pursue careers in engineering and programs for engineers at Oracle.

Tell us about your job. Where did your passion for building inclusive engineering teams start?

As a student, I was a student representative for software engineering and active in many affiliate groups (women in engineering, etc.). I did my undergraduate in Scotland, and our class started out with a pretty balanced gender ratio, but towards my third and fourth year, more and more women dropped out of computer science to pursue other disciplines. In grad school, I again saw a very dramatic decrease in women completing their degrees. When I started working, I was the only woman on a team of 20 guys—so I really knew it was important to take that step to make connections. It was almost selfish—I wanted to have someone to have lunch with.

What do you love about what you do?

It’s really rewarding seeing young women grow and develop in their careers over time.

Who has inspired you on your journey?

Olya Irzak. She started out as a software engineer at a big company but her passion has always been climate change. She’s the first person I’ve met who is committing her life to real, actionable change.

Olya took a big risk by leaving the comfort of her big company job to start her own company called Frost Methane Labs. She put together a team of engineers, and they work with research partners to identify natural sources of methane gas. They developed a self-sustaining device that mitigates concentrated methane leaking from Arctic natural gas reservoirs.

What’s your biggest takeaway from Olya?

She taught me about the benefits that come when we take a risk in pursuit of our passions. We have a lot of super-talented technical women. It’s really about building up the confidence to take that leap or even small step to follow your dream. It’s also the confidence to say, “I don’t know how to do this.” She identified where she had gaps and was able to build out a team that truly complemented each other’s strengths—and ultimately, she was able to create better solutions because of that humility.

The theme for International Women's Day is “Let’s all be each for equal,” a call to create a more gender-balanced world. What does this mean to you?

Actually, my kids started asking me about this topic this year. I have a son and a daughter. My son recently asked me why girls’ t-shirts had these empowering slogans like “Girls can do anything!” and he didn’t see boys’ t-shirts like that. It was interesting to walk through some of women’s history with my 6-year-old to explain that, "Hey, girls haven’t always been told that they could do anything. The world hasn’t always been this full of possibility for women." It was interesting that he had to ask—because he hadn’t noticed an obvious difference. For the next generation, it just doesn’t make sense why people would be treated any different. So that’s what it’s about—that point where you don’t need explain it.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

I have two little kids so they definitely take up a good chunk of my time. I also practice karate. I’m involved even in karate club at the Oracle gym! Other than that, I enjoy the Bay Area and take advantage of all the hiking and good food around.

What’s your guilty pleasure?

My goodness—the Oracle 300 Bakery. They make unique pastries every day, and I can’t resist them, especially if there’s something with marshmallow or mousse.

What makes Oracle a great place to work?

I enjoy the flexibility we have—more so than other companies I’ve seen around. As an engineer, it’s up to you. Some people love working late at night or early morning, and when your priorities change, you can plan your time in a way that works for you. I’ve also been really lucky to work on some incredible teams. It’s the people that make it!

What are trends you see in tech and what do they mean for women?

The trend for young engineers entering the workforce is that a lot of them care about giving back to the community through technology. They’re looking for projects around sustainability and education.

If you could share only one bit of advice to your younger self, what would it be?

One thing no one told me is that engineering is one of the best careers for a mom. When I was thinking about careers, I was taking lots of factors into account, and I always knew I wanted a family. Engineering gives you a lot of flexibility and portability. You can do things on your own timeline and in the location that is best for you. When my son was really young, I asked him what my job was and he said, “To take care of me and my sister.” And I was like, “That’s it, I’ve won! I have a full-time job and I’m a full-time mom.”

If you’d like to learn more about how Oracle women lead the way at work and in the world, visit Women at Oracle online. You can also view our diversity and inclusion community.

Hotels Maximize Event Revenue Potential with Oracle

Wed, 2020-03-04 07:00
Press Release
Hotels Maximize Event Revenue Potential with Oracle From intimate weddings to large conferences, event planning and execution can be managed seamlessly in the cloud

REDWOOD SHORES, Calif.—Mar 4, 2020

Event space rentals, planning and catering are critical to maximizing hotel revenue, but they are often managed  by hotel sales and operations working in silos, creating inefficiencies and missed opportunities. With OPERA Sales and Event Management in the cloud, Oracle Hospitality is helping properties increase their event revenue by optimizing inventory, bookings, streamlining logistics and delighting hosts with standout execution.

Oracle Hospitality OPERA Sales and Event Management Cloud Service (Oracle Hospitality OSEM) is a feature-rich sales and catering management application. Integrated with Oracle Hospitality OPERA Cloud Service, the offering is compliant across more than 200 countries and built on the Oracle Gen 2 Cloud for organizations committed to assuring high performance, security, reliability, and availability for their most important business applications. With it, hotels across the globe are able to easily streamline operations, increase communication and cooperation across departments, and respond faster to customers.

“Whether they’re booking a corporate function or planning a personal occasion, today’s meeting planners and guests expect the same seamless experience and speed of service from hotel sales teams that they’ve come to expect in every other aspect of their lives,” said Laura Calin, vice president of strategy, Oracle Hospitality. “Shifting sales and event management to the cloud gives hotel sales staff the agility and visibility to provide a better experience for customers while simplifying time-consuming back-office processes.”


The user-defined dashboard provides a quick overview and access points to groups, events and activities of the day.

With Oracle Hospitality OSEM in the cloud, hotels have a single view of all event booking details and revenue across rooms and event spaces for easier audit and analysis. With this, they can eliminate extra time spent on duplicate data entries into the property management system and allow hotels to realize operational efficiencies through increased productivity. It also allows for external API integrations to help hoteliers complete e-proposals and countless other applications.

Hotel event and catering managers also have the freedom to do business from anywhere at any time. They can take Oracle Hospitality OSEM with them to offsite customer visits or roam the property with prospects and event hosts during site inspections. They are also able to easily share available space options and setups, as well as check available inventory, create a room block, and make changes to or complete bookings, all while on the go.

Hotels such as the Inn at Serenbe, Banff Park Lodge and The University Plaza Waterfront Hotel are among some of the early adopters already using Oracle Hospitality OSEM to better serve guests and groups.

Banff Park Lodge Breaks Free from Mundane Tasks to Secure More Bookings

Surrounded by the natural beauty of the Canadian Rockies, Banff Park Lodge Resort Hotel and Conference Centre is an international destination offering 19,000 square feet of conference space with 18 different room combinations ranging from boardrooms to ballrooms. After going live with OPERA Cloud, Banff Park added Oracle Hospitality OSEM in December 2019 to minimize administrative and manual work, allowing sales staff to break free from data entry and get out from behind their desks to serve clients and secure more bookings.

“Now that we are live, our sales and events teams are no longer tasked with having to spend hours a day on manual data entry. And because OSEM is cloud based, we can access and more broadly share the Banff Park Lodge property anywhere via a mobile device,” said David Spence, director of sales and marketing at Banff Park Lodge. “The future is truly exciting as we are now running on a secure platform that will never just sit on a shelf. With automatic updates via the cloud, we are able to continuously evolve to meet the changing needs of our clients and guests.”

Single Source of Information Streamlines Operations at University Plaza Waterfront Hotel

With panoramic views of the city and the California Delta, The University Plaza Waterfront Hotel offers its guests luxurious accommodations with 15,000 square feet of meeting space, all conveniently located in the heart of the historic district of downtown Stockton. Being forced to move off its multiple legacy systems in under 90 days, University Plaza Waterfront turned to Oracle Hospitality to rapidly migrate to OPERA Cloud and Oracle Hospitality OSEM. After a successful implementation, the property was up and running in December 2019. The move is already paying dividends by giving front desk and sales staff access to the same real-time information from one system.

“Previously we were tied to four separate systems that didn’t speak to each other. It was a nightmare for staff to try to access real-time information because it just didn’t exist. Our front desk staff had no visibility into what was going on with events and vice versa,” said Rhona Miles, general manager, The University Plaza Waterfront Hotel. “Now that we are live on one, central system in the cloud our entire staff has visibility into everything from sales to front desk to reservations and housekeeping.” 

Learn more about Oracle Hospitality OPERA Sales and Event Management Cloud Service here.

Contact Info
Christine Allen
Oracle
+1.603.743.4534
christine.allen@oracle.com
About Oracle Hospitality

Oracle Hospitality brings over 40 years of experience in providing technology solutions to independent hoteliers, global and regional chains, gaming, and cruise lines. We provide hardware, software, and services that allow our customers to act on rich data insights that deliver personalized guest experiences, maximize profitability and encourage long-term loyalty. Our solutions include platforms for property management, point-of-sale, distribution, reporting and analytics all delivered from the cloud to lower IT cost and maximize business agility. Oracle Hospitality’s OPERA is recognized globally as the leading property management platform and continues to serve as a foundation for industry innovation. 

For more information about Oracle Hospitality, please visit www.oracle.com/Hospitality 

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Christine Allen

  • +1.603.743.4534

Small Restaurants Take A Bite Out of Costs with Oracle MICROS

Tue, 2020-03-03 07:00
Press Release
Small Restaurants Take A Bite Out of Costs with Oracle MICROS New point-of-sale suite meets the service needs of small businesses

FOOD & BEVERAGE CONNECT, Miami, Florida—Mar 3, 2020

For restaurant owners and entrepreneurs, great food alone is not enough. With constantly changing consumer tastes and food prices, it is difficult to control cost and protect margins. With the new Oracle Food and Beverage MICROS and Simphony Point-of-Sale (POS) systems, designed for small and growing businesses, restaurant operators gain the intelligence needed to make fast, cost-conscious decisions on everything from menus to staffing—while providing a seamless guest experience.

With dependability and reliability at the core, the Oracle MICROS Workstation 6 Series can scale with restaurants from start-up to rapid-scale. The systems are stylish, yet rugged enough to exceed the typical performance of consumer-grade devices, all at a price point small business can afford. The 6 series features fast configuration, and includes advanced security features like disabling unused input/output (I/O) ports. They also can run on batteries, providing additional flexibility and longevity.

“Although there are common challenges and needs that thread through each restaurant environment, every brand is unique. The technology solutions we deliver are as diverse as the customers we serve and are designed solutions to support current and future aspirations,” said Simon de Montfort Walker, senior vice president and general manager for Oracle Food and Beverage. “We are invested in building solutions for the growing restaurant business because the technology they choose today will impact their ability to achieve their growth goals tomorrow.”

New York Burger is proof of the power and scalability of the MICROS platform. “As the business grew, we found our existing solution was not up to the challenge, and inefficiencies meant our customers were kept waiting,” said Pablo Colmenares, founder, New York Burger. “Oracle has definitely helped us to streamline our operations. It is simple and fast to use, and utilizing the product helped us become a smarter business. Oracle has a great global reputation; there is a reason why the biggest brands in the world trust Oracle. Every strong tree needs strong roots and Oracle is our roots.”

Designed to work seamlessly with the latest release of Oracle MICROS Simphony, small restaurant business owners can cost-effectively leverage one of the most intelligently designed and fully integrated POS solutions on the market, to establish a foundation for growth.

Learn more about the latest innovations in POS and how Oracle Food and Beverage is designing solutions to help businesses reach their growth potential: https://www.oracle.com/industries/food-beverage/

Contact Info
Scott Porter
Oracle Corporate Communications
+1.650.274.9519
scott.c.porter@oracle.com
Katie Barron
Oracle Corporate Communications
+1.202.904.1138
katie.barron@oracle.com
About Oracle Food and Beverage

Oracle Food and Beverage, formerly MICROS, brings 40 years of experience in providing software and hardware solutions to restaurants, bars, pubs, clubs, coffee shops, cafes, stadiums, and theme parks. Thousands of operators, both large and small, around the world are using Oracle technology to deliver exceptional guest experiences, maximize sales, and reduce running costs.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Scott Porter

  • +1.650.274.9519

Katie Barron

  • +1.202.904.1138

Restaurants Serve Up Agility and Reliability with New Oracle Tech

Tue, 2020-03-03 07:00
Press Release
Restaurants Serve Up Agility and Reliability with New Oracle Tech Oracle MICROS point-of-sale systems delivers modern, easy experience to restaurant owners, staff, and customers alike

FOOD & BEVERAGE CONNECT, Miami, Florida—Mar 3, 2020

The food and beverage industry is constantly challenged to meet changing demands without impacting great service. Some of these businesses need the flexibility to field a pop-up shop or food truck to extend their brands, while others must speed the ordering process to cut customer wait times. To help meet all these needs and more Oracle unveiled its new MICROS Workstation 625 and 655 Point-Of-Sale (POS) systems today at Oracle Food and Beverage Connect.

No matter if it’s a fast-casual, fine-dining or stadium setting, the hardware offers key enhancements for optimal performance, efficiency and self-service. For example, the systems feature a larger non-glare screen for improved performance in bright locations and more expedient, error-free order entry; simplified employee sign-in for improved management and reporting; tamper detection for greater physical security; and reduced power requirements for longer device usage without charging. The systems also offers an enhanced speaker design for digital KIOSKs to improve the self-ordering experience for customers.

“Successful restaurant businesses live in constant motion and are always poised for change,” said Simon de Montfort Walker, senior vice president and general manager for Oracle Food and Beverage. “Our technology is purpose-built for the unpredictable restaurant environment; not just day-to-day complexities but the challenges associated with growing a successful business.”

The new Workstation models are built upon a heritage of performance, reliability and longevity—for even the harshest environments. The MICROS hardware and Simphony point-of-sale software operate with a consistent interface, features and functionality ensuring a seamless experience for all stakeholders throughout a venue. This enables restaurant owners to optimize performance, streamline operations, reduce costs, and increase revenue-generating opportunities while improving the overall customer experience.

“Increasing market pressures, sweeping regulations, and changes in consumer expectations for experiential hospitality call for the industry to act in innovative ways that meet rising expectations, improve outcomes, and deliver value,” said Leslie Hand, global vice president, IDC Retail Insights. “The technology decisions made today must consider the future state of the business so that when the next wave of disruption comes, they have a strong infrastructure from which to build and continue to innovate on.”

These next generation of Oracle MICROS Workstations are one of the innovations Oracle is bringing to market to help customers simplify operations, establish a platform for growth, and create unique and engaging brand experiences for their guests.

Oracle also announced today, the latest release of the Oracle MICROS Simphony point-of-sale, which supports the new Oracle Linux for MICROS workstations—allowing operators the flexibility to choose between appliance-like, lower-cost, built for purpose hardware or an adaptable, open architecture that can be molded into any environment. 

Contact Info
Scott Porter
Oracle Corporate Communications
+1.650.274.9519
scott.c.porter@oracle.com
Katie Barron
Oracle Corporate Communications
+1.202.904.1138
katie.barron@oracle.com
About Oracle Food and Beverage

Oracle Food and Beverage, formerly MICROS, brings 40 years of experience in providing software and hardware solutions to restaurants, bars, pubs, clubs, coffee shops, cafes, stadiums, and theme parks. Thousands of operators, both large and small, around the world are using Oracle technology to deliver exceptional guest experiences, maximize sales, and reduce running costs.

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Scott Porter

  • +1.650.274.9519

Katie Barron

  • +1.202.904.1138

Growing Fashion Retailer Taps Oracle to Increase Focus on Customers

Mon, 2020-03-02 08:00
Press Release
Growing Fashion Retailer Taps Oracle to Increase Focus on Customers Sportina uses Oracle Retail to boost customer service while driving operational efficiency

Redwood Shores,Calif.—Mar 2, 2020

Sportina, a leading fashion retailer in southeast Europe is using Oracle Retail to modernize its operations and better serve customers, however they chose to shop. Sportina curates fashion collections for women, men, and children across 90 brands, including Hugo Boss, Burberry, Dsquared, Superdry, Tom Tailor, Jack&Jones and Marx in more than 350 stores across 11 countries. With Oracle, Sportina was able to standardize its diverse business on a modern retail technology platform to break down barriers between geographies and brands to optimize inventory availability for customers.  

“Sportina Group supports a range of different business models, including our own brand, multi-brand, franchise, and wholesale. In order to support this complexity, we recognized the need to centralize and consolidate our planning processes to deliver transparency,” Miha Rozman, head of controlling, Sportina. “Sportina is an efficient and fast-moving fashion retailer. We chose Oracle to improve efficiency and increase productivity. Most importantly, this modernization allowed us to design a new planning process that places the customer at the center of our operations from the strategic vision through the planning to execution.”

Today, Sportina segments its portfolio brands into five segments including luxury, premium, core, entry and casual. The segmentation respects customers’ individual style, preference and uniqueness while evoking passion, creativity, and fun by delivering relevant offers that drive loyalty. By delivering what a consumer wants, Sportina can avoid markdowns and increase gross margin. With full visibility to inventory availability across all channels, the Sportina team can decrease transfer costs and increase stock rotation.

“Culturally, we are an organization driven by the entrepreneurial spirit. Through our collaborative initiative with Oracle, we were able to outline the responsibilities, accountability, and ownership across the business and design a platform that supported and optimized each. With the modernization, we gained full stock availability throughout all channels,” said David Rezar, head of merchandise planning, Sportina. “We have increased the stock rotation and decreased transfer costs by implementing an initial and replenishment order split.”

Working with Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) member Pronos, Sportina implemented Oracle Retail Merchandise Financial Planning in 16 weeks. This was followed by an implementation of an Oracle Retail Lifecycle Inventory Planning framework designed by Oracle Retail Consulting in under eight months. Pronos provided broad mutli-branded fashion implementation experience. Next, Pronos will continue to support Sportina on their digital transformation with the implementation of Oracle Retail Offer Optimization.

“Convenience is king for customers. They want to go online or in a store and get what they are looking for quickly,” said Mike Webster, senior vice president, and general manager, Oracle Retail. “To deliver on this, brands must put customers at the center of their planning process. This means ensuring the right inventory is moved to the right locations to appeal to customer interests and needs. With Oracle, Sportina has been able to reimagine this entire process to improve both business efficiency and customer outcomes.”

Contact Info
Kaitlin Ambrogio
Oracle PR
+1.781.434.9555
kaitlin.ambrogio@oracle.com
About Oracle Retail

Oracle is the modern platform for retail. Oracle provides retailers with a complete, open, and integrated platform for best-of-breed business applications, cloud services, and hardware that are engineered to work together. Leading fashion, grocery, and specialty retailers use Oracle solutions to accelerate from best practice to next practice, drive operational agility, and refine the customer experience. For more information, visit our website www.oracle.com/retail 

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

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Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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Kaitlin Ambrogio

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Hotels Worldwide Check Into Cloud with Oracle

Thu, 2020-02-27 07:00
Press Release
Hotels Worldwide Check Into Cloud with Oracle Global hotel brands embrace Oracle Cloud Hospitality Solutions to modernize operations

Redwood Shores,Calif.—Feb 27, 2020

Banff Park Lodge

Hoteliers know they must deliver exceptional experiences to keep guests happy and loyal. To do so, hospitality brands are choosing Oracle Hospitality OPERA Cloud services to personalize guest experiences, offer new and innovative services and empower staff to provide guests with high-touch customer service anytime, anywhere.  

B Hotel Brasília, Banff Park Lodge, Centara Hotels & Resorts, Guy Harvey Resort, Iconic Hotels, Manquehue Hotels, Post Hotel Weggis, Albana Hotel & Suites, Hotel Graziella, Hotel Mesikämmen, Mӧvenpick Resort, SantaPark Arctic World, SSA Spot Apartments, The Inn at Serenbe, and The University Plaza Waterfront are among the many hotels around the world that have adopted OPERA Cloud. With it, they are able to streamline and secure operations, reduce IT costs and complexity, innovate faster, and untether front desk staff to better serve guests from anywhere on property.

Built on the Oracle Gen 2 Cloud for organizations committed to assuring high performance, security, reliability, and availability for their most important business applications, OPERA Cloud is a mobile-enabled, cloud-based platform for next-generation hotel property management. It delivers an intuitive user interface, comprehensive functionality for all areas of hotel management, secure data storage, automated patching and upgrades, and access to hundreds of key partner interfaces through its open APIs to meet the needs of hotels of all types and sizes.

“Guest expectations are morphing quickly and the cloud allows hoteliers to accelerate the pace of innovation to keep up with these changes,” said Laura Calin, vice president strategy and solutions management, Oracle Hospitality. “Our customers are realizing the benefits of the cloud and already are taking advantage of OPERA’s open architecture to create unique guest experiences and rethink all the ways they can deliver amazing guest services.”

OPERA Cloud Levels the Playing Field for Banff Park Lodge

For an independent property like Banff Park Lodge, nestled in the pristine mecca of the Canadian Rockies, hotel life is beautiful but busy. You name it, the lodge does it: Conferences. Weddings. Functions. Trade shows. In December 2019, the hotel went live on OPERA Cloud to offload critical IT tasks and concerns, and focus on what matters most: delivering exceptional service to its guests.

“The challenge for us is, we have to do everything a larger operator or chain does, but we have to do it with far less people, far less money and far less expertise,” said Steven Schultz, director of rooms, Banff Park Lodge. “For us, anything we can essentially offload—or load into the cloud—is a big win. We can offload our exposure, our hardware. We don’t have to worry about maintaining large server banks. We can get all that off our plate.”

SSA Spot Apartments Focuses on Self-Service with OPERA Cloud

Finland’s SSA Spot Apartments offers simple online booking and 120 comfortably furnished rooms in seven locations in the Helsinki area. To make its self-service business model a success, Spot turned to OPERA Cloud in October 2019 to gain complete visibility across its entire operations. OPERA’s key benefits such as centralized control of information and operations, elimination of on-site servers, and reduction of IT costs and complexity began yielding dividends immediately.

“Our management and data-reliant departments such as accounting are loving OPERA Cloud because it allows them to clearly see what’s going on and how the business is evolving,” said Jani Liljavirta, revenue manager, SSA Hotels. “With OPERA, we’re managing everything centrally, and our business model matches our infrastructure.”

OPERA Cloud Empowers Faster Service for Saint Augustine’s Guy Harvey Resort

Drawing vacationers from across the Southeast, Guy Harvey Resort in Saint Augustine Beach, Florida offers guests unforgettable experiences like dolphin tours alongside on-site food and beverage options and spectacular ocean views. With a long history of partnership with Oracle, Guy Harvey Group went live on OPERA Cloud in November 2019 to enhance security and tackle growing IT complexity. Following success in Saint Augustine, the hotel has already set plans for a second property rollout.

“We’re able to run quicker with OPERA Cloud,” said Larry Collier, director of operations, Guy Harvey Group. “From check-ins to managing room blocks, our staff is able to move more efficiently. The intuitive user interface made our front-of-house staff eager to jump on board and moving to the cloud has helped us manage growing complexity as we move to keep pace with travelers’ expectations.”

Learn more about Oracle Hospitality Solutions here.

Contact Info
Christine Allen
Oracle
+1.603.743.4534
christine.allen@oracle.com
About Oracle Hospitality

Oracle Hospitality brings over 40 years of experience in providing technology solutions to independent hoteliers, global and regional chains, gaming, and cruise lines. We provide hardware, software, and services that allow our customers to act on rich data insights that deliver personalized guest experiences, maximize profitability and encourage long-term loyalty. Our solutions include platforms for property management, point-of-sale, distribution, reporting and analytics all delivered from the cloud to lower IT cost and maximize business agility. Oracle Hospitality’s OPERA is recognized globally as the leading property management platform and continues to serve as a foundation for industry innovation. 

For more information about Oracle Hospitality, please visit www.oracle.com/Hospitality 

About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Christine Allen

  • +1.603.743.4534

We Are so Appreciative for the Show of Support!

Thu, 2020-02-20 05:00
Blog
We Are so Appreciative for the Show of Support!

Ken Glueck, Executive Vice President, Oracle—Feb 20, 2020

NOTE: Before we turn to the more than 30 amicus briefs filed in support of Oracle at the Supreme Court, we are obligated to highlight the conduct of Google’s head of Global Affairs and Chief Legal Officer, Kent Walker. Over the past few months, Walker led a coercion campaign against companies and organizations that were likely to file on Oracle’s behalf to persuade them to stay silent.  We are aware of more than half a dozen contacts by Mr. Walker (or his representatives) to likely amici, but we probably only heard of a small piece of his efforts.

In our previous posts we detailed the facts in Google v. Oracle: Google copied verbatim 11,000 lines of Java code and then broke Java’s interoperability. We explained that Google knew fully that the Java code was subject to copyright but decided to copy it anyway and “make enemies along the way.”  We discussed IBM’s Jailbreak initiative, which was aborted because everyone understood—including Google and IBM—that Sun’s code was subject to a copyright license. 

We explained how there was never any confusion in the industry about how copyright was applied to software and no contemporaneous discussion whatsoever distinguishing between some code that’s copyrightable and other code that isn’t. All of this parsing of code was invented after the fact by Google. We discussed the impossibility of the Supreme Court drawing lines between some code and not other code (on a case-by-case basis), without undermining copyright protection for all computer programs, which is exactly Google’s intent. Lastly, we explained that Google’s business model is predicated on monetizing the content of others so its economic interests are correlated to weak intellectual property protection. And that is exactly why most members of the technology community declined to file briefs on Google’s behalf. 

More than 30 businesses, organizations, and individuals filed amicus briefs with the Supreme Court. The numerous amicus briefs filed on our behalf largely reflect actual owners of copyrights that have a direct stake in the outcome of this matter, and I wanted to highlight a few of them here. Most importantly, the totality of the briefs make an overwhelming case for the court to reject Google’s attempt to retroactively carve itself out of the law.

To start, the United States Solicitor General filed a brief in support of Oracle on behalf of the United States Government. The Solicitor General’s office will also participate in oral arguments before the Supreme Court, making clear that longstanding U.S. intellectual property policy is fundamentally at odds with Google’s position. It’s really hard to overstate how strong the Solicitor General’s brief is on Oracle’s behalf.  For example, the SG states “Contrary to [Google]’s contention, the Copyright Office has never endorsed the kind of copying in which [Google] engaged." … "[Google] declined to take [the open source] or any other license, despite 'lengthy licensing negotiations' with [Oracle].  Instead, [Google] simply appropriated the material it wanted." And, “[T]he fair use doctrine does not permit a new market entrant to copy valuable parts of an established work simply to attract fans to its own competing commercial product. To the contrary, copying ‘to get attention or to avoid the drudgery in working up something fresh’ actively disserves copyright’s goals.”

“[Google’s] approach [to copyrightability] is especially misguided because the particular post-creation changed circumstance on which it relies—i.e., developers’ acquired familiarity with the calls used to invoke various methods in the Java Standard Library—is a direct result of the Library’s marketplace success.” The SG continued, “Google designed its Android platform in a manner that made it incompatible with the Java platform. Pet. App. 46a n.11. Petitioner thus is not seeking to ensure that its new products are compatible with a ‘legacy product’ (Pet. Br. 26). Petitioner instead created a competing platform and copied thousands of lines of code from the Java Standard Library in order to attract software developers familiar with respondent’s work.”

And the SG stated, “The court of appeals correctly held that petitioner’s verbatim copying of respondent’s original computer code into a competing commercial product was not fair use.” Lastly, “the record contained  ‘overwhelming’  evidence that petitioner’s copying harmed the market for the Java platform.”

A brief by several songwriters and the Songwriters Guild explains that much like Oracle’s Java software, a large portion of music streams on YouTube are misappropriated for the good of Google and Google alone—“Through YouTube, Google profits directly from verbatim copies of Amici’s own works. These copies are unauthorized, unlicensed, and severely under-monetized.”

A brief filed by Recording Industry Association of America, National Music Publishers Association, and the American Association of Independent Music makes clear that its “members depend on an appropriately balanced fair use doctrine that furthers the purposes of copyright law, including the rights to control the reproduction and distribution of copyrighted works, to create derivative works, and to license the creation of derivative works.”

Briefs were filed expressing similar concerns from a broad spectrum of the creative community, including journalists, book publishers, photographers, authors, and the motion picture industry. Google’s attempts to retroactively justify a clear act of infringement with novel theories of software copyright and fair use have alarmed nearly every segment of the artistic and creative community.

Another amicus brief from the News Media Alliance (over 2,000 news media organizations), explains how Google Search, Google News and other online platforms appropriate vast quantities of its members’ journalistic output, and reproduces it to displace the original creative content. They point out that, as journalists, they often sit on both sides of the “fair use” defense, but warn that they “cannot stand silent when entire digital industries are built, and technology companies seek to achieve and maintain dominance, by the overly aggressive assertion of fair use as Google does in this case.”

And USTelecom, the national trade association representing the nation’s broadband industry, including technology providers, innovators, suppliers, and manufacturers. USTelecom notes that its members are poised to invest $350 billion in their software-driven networks over the next several years, laying the foundation for 5G. Software interfaces are also important for network providers to “enable interoperability among technologies, networks, and devices,” and “while telecommunications providers must share access to their software interfaces, they also must retain their exclusive property rights in their implementation of these interfaces if they are to ensure network security and resiliency, protect their customers’ privacy, innovate and compete.”

We were pleased that some of the most prominent names in technology—who were contemporaneous witnesses to Google’s theft—have filed amicus briefs in support Oracle’s position, including Scott McNealy, the longtime CEO of Sun Microsystems, and Joe Tucci, the longtime CEO of EMC Corporation. Mr. Tucci states, “as the numbers and ever-increasing success show, the system is working. Accepting Google’s invitation to upend that system by eliminating copyright protection for creative and original computer software code would not make the system better—it would instead have sweeping and harmful effects throughout the software industry.”

Several of our amici note in their briefs that the Constitution includes copyright protection in Article I, Section 8. As Consumers’ Research explains in their brief, “to the Founders, copyrights were not just a way to encourage innovation, but also to protect people’s inherent rights in the fruits of their labor. Any conception of copyright that ignores the latter is both incomplete and inconsistent with the original understanding of the Copyright Clause.”

One of the key points Oracle makes in our brief to the Court is the clear Congressional intent and action to provide full copyright protection to software, and the longstanding refusal by Congress to create any distinctions between different types of software code (such as “interfaces”).

Several of our amici reinforce this fact, none less authoritative than the former Senate and House Judiciary Chairmen. Former Senators Orrin Hatch and Dennis DeConcini, and former Congressman Bob Goodlatte make it clear that Google’s invitation to the Court to carve out some ill-defined category of “interfaces” from the Copyright Act’s full protection of all software code is contrary to the intent of Congress and plain language of the statute. According to the former Chairmen, “[B]oth the text and history of the Copyright Act show that Congress accorded computer programs full copyright protection, with no carve-out for some undefined subset of software.”

Furthermore, the former Members state, it would be beyond the purview of the Court to respond to Google and its amici’s policy arguments in favor of creating new standards of copyrightability and fair use for different, loosely defined categories of software. “This Court should not undermine [Congress’s] legislative judgment … by creating the loopholes to copyrightability and fair use that Google requests.”

The Members further point out, “to the extent that Google has a different, less-protective vision for the federal copyright regime, it is ‘free to seek action from Congress.’ (quoting the Solicitor General). Thus far, Congress has not seen fit to take such action, notwithstanding its recent comprehensive review of the federal copyright laws, which directly examined the scope of copyright protection and technological innovation. This Court should not diminish copyright protections for computer programs where Congress, as is its constitutional prerogative, has chosen to refrain from doing so for four decades.”

The Members’ points are given further emphasis by the extremely important brief from Professor Arthur Miller, who was a Presidential appointee to the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works (“CONTU”), where he served on the Software Subcommittee. Professor Miller forcefully rebuts Google’s contention that the Java code it copied should be denied protection either because it was so popular or because it was in some category of un-protectable software it refers to as “interfaces.”

Congress had good reason not to enact a popularity exception to copyright. As an initial matter, such an exception would lure the courts into a hopeless exercise in line-drawing: Just how popular must a work become before the creator is penalized with loss of protection?… Nor does calling the copied material an “interface” aid in the line-drawing exercise. Though that term “may seem precise * * * it really has no specific meaning in programming. Certainly, it has no meaning that has any relevance to copyright principles.” (citing his seminal Harvard Law Review article on software copyright). “Any limitation on the protection of ‘interfaces’ thus would be a limitation on the protection of much of the valuable expression in programs, and would invite plagiarists to label as an ‘interface’ whatever they have chosen to copy without permission.” Ibid. More importantly, a popularity exception would eviscerate the goal of the Copyright Act, which is to promote advancements. “The purpose of copyright is to create incentives for creative effort.” Sony v. Universal City Studios. But advance too far and create widely desired work, petitioner warns, and risk losing copyright protection altogether; anyone will be able to copy the previously protected material by claiming that doing so was “necessary.” That logic is head-scratching. “[P]romoting the unauthorized copying of interfaces penalizes the creative effort of the original designer, something that runs directly counter to the core purposes of copyright law because it may freeze or substantially impede human innovation and technological growth.” (citing Miller Harvard Law Review article).

This history of strong copyright protection is further explained in the brief by the Committee for Justice: “The framers of the U.S. Constitution designed that document to protect the right to property. It was understood that strong property rights were fundamental to freedom and prosperity. The Constitution’s Copyright Clause is a critical part of this project. The clause empowers Congress to enact laws to protect intellectual property, which was understood to be worthy of protection in the same sense and to the same degree that tangible property is. Congress has taken up the task by enacting a series of Copyright Acts that have steadily expanded the protection afforded intellectual property. This, in turn, has led to a robust and thriving market for intellectual property.”

Likewise, the American Conservative Union Foundation, Internet Accountability Project, and American Legislative Exchange Council all recount the long history of copyright protections, going back to the Constitution, and the importance of maintaining a system of strong intellectual property rights. They also weigh-in against Google’s fair use defense. 

Similarly the Hudson Institute makes the point that if the Supreme Court were to adopt Google’s breathtakingly expansive view of fair use, it would “provide a roadmap to foreign actors like China to circumvent U.S. and international copyright protection for computer code and other works. Such a roadmap, if adopted by this Court, will remove the brighter lines and greater clarity provided by the decision below, and would eliminate a significant tool for private and governmental enforcement of IP rights.”

In separate briefs, two large software companies, Synopsys and SAS Institute, explain how the use of software code and “interfaces” actually work in the real world. Synopsis explains that the purpose of its brief is “to challenge the notion, offered by Google and its amici, that the copying of someone else’s code is a mainstay of the computer programming world. It is simply not true that ‘everybody does it,’ and that software piracy allows for lawful innovative entrepreneurship, as Google suggests.

SAS takes head-on the absurdity of Google’s professed interest in “interoperability” as the pretense for its unlicensed use of Oracle’s code. “Google copied the software interfaces not because it wanted Android applications to interoperate with Java, but so it could attract Java programmers for Android to replace Java. ‘Unrebutted evidence’ showed ‘that Google specifically designed Android to be incompatible with the Java platform and not allow for interoperability with Java programs.’ (citing Fed. Circuit decision). No case has found fair use where the defendant copied to produce an incompatible product.”

SAS also provides a powerful rebuttal to Google’s request for the Court to create new judicial carve-out from the Copyright Act for software “interfaces.” “There are unlimited ways to write interfaces, and nothing justifies removing them from what the Copyright Act expressly protects. To the contrary, the user-friendly expressive choices Sun made became critical to Java’s success. The thousands of lines of Java declaring code and the organization Google copied are intricate, creative expression. … The creativity is undeniable. ‘Google’s own ‘Java guru’ conceded that there can be ‘creativity and artistry even in a single method declaration.’” (citing Fed. Circuit decision) SAS goes on to provide detailed examples of the creative expression in declaring code.

I’ll conclude with the powerful brief of the former Register of Copyrights, Ralph Oman.  Mr. Oman forcefully rebuts the “sky is falling” rhetoric of Google and its amici regarding copyrights and software.

Copyright protection has spurred greater creativity, competition, and technological advancement, fueling an unprecedented period of intellectual growth and one of America’s greatest economic sectors today—software development. While Congress is of course free to revisit the application of copyright to software if it believes changes to the current regime are warranted, there is no basis for this Court to assume that policymaking role here. Instead, this Court should give effect to Congress’s intent, as embodied in the 1976 Act and its subsequent amendments, that traditional copyright principles apply to software just as these principles apply to other works. Applying those principles to the record in this case, the Federal Circuit properly concluded that Google’s conceded copying of the APIs infringed Oracle’s copyrights. While the technology at issue may be novel, the result that such free riding is not allowed is as old as copyright law itself.

We are grateful for this diverse, influential group of more than 30 amici, which we are certain will provide important, valuable insight to the Court in its deliberations.

We know that many of them have spoken up despite Google’s campaign of intimidation, which makes us even more appreciative.

Broad Coalition Files Supreme Court Briefs Supporting Oracle

Wed, 2020-02-19 11:07
Press Release
Broad Coalition Files Supreme Court Briefs Supporting Oracle Amici urge Court to reject Google’s attempt to weaken copyright protection in the United States

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Feb 19, 2020

A wide array of individuals and organizations from across technology, arts and culture, government, advocacy, and academia filed amicus briefs this week supporting Oracle in the Supreme Court. This diverse group is speaking out to defend copyright protection and to reject Google’s attempts to excuse its theft of more than 11,000 lines of Oracle’s original code.

Commenting on the briefs, Oracle General Counsel Dorian Daley said: “Google is attempting to rewrite the fundamental copyright protections that fuel innovation in this country. The amicus briefs make clear that to avoid significant consequences well beyond the software industry, Google’s self-serving arguments and attempts to rewrite long-settled law must be rejected.”

The fallacies in Google’s arguments, as well as additional context about the case are set forth in Executive Vice President Ken Glueck’s recent blog posts about the importance of copyright protection and the absence of support for Google’s position in the technology community.

Excerpts from the amicus briefs filed today upend Google’s claim that upholding the current ruling and existing law will crush innovation in the software industry. As the briefs demonstrate, that stance is not just inaccurate – the reverse is true.

Google wields a variety of weaponized copyright exceptions on top of rhetoric that is both deceptively public-spirited (letting Google win is “promoting innovation”) and ominous (impeding Google would “break the internet”). Google further seeks to justify these exceptions by trying to hide behind small players. It engages in astroturfing tactics to give the impression that it has more public support than it does.” (Songwriters Guild of America, pp. 16-17) (unless otherwise noted, all emphasis is added)

“[W]hat is good for Google is not synonymous with what is good for the public. […] In fact, a ruling for Google would be “promoting” software innovation only in that the purported “innovation” would be furthering Google’s private interest—i.e., using works without permission or a license fee.” (Songwriters Guild of America, p. 32)

No reasonable person would invest resources in creating an original work if another person could lawfully extract material portions of that work and incorporate them into a marketplace replacement.” (Internet Accountability Project, p. 4)

Oracle’s code was undoubtedly creative and copyright protected.

“Google has appointed itself the world’s ‘organize[r]’ of other people’s information…and in this case it copied verbatim substantial amounts of Oracle’s software to do so.” (Internet Accountability Project, p. 1)

“[M]ore than enough creative choices were made by [Oracle’s programmers] in creating the 7,000 lines of declaring code…to satisfy the copyright requirements.” (Interdisciplinary Research Team on Programmer Creativity, p. 19)

“[I]t is clear that there were thousands of different ways [that Oracle’s] APIs could have been written when they were created . . . [and] that they are protected from copying by the Copyright Act.” (Interdisciplinary Research Team on Programmer Creativity, pp. 19-20)

Google could have licensed Oracle’s software but chose to copy it instead.

The inconvenience of not copying does not excuse copying.” (American Conservative Union, p. 14)

“Google and its amici seek to establish a rule of general applicability in the software industry that will justify future unauthorized copying whenever it saves the copier time and money.” (American Conservative Union, p. 18)

“Google asserts [that its] choice to copy proves that Google had no choice other than to copy. Yet Google’s assertion that it “reused” the declarations “only because it had no other choice,” finds no support in the record. The obvious other choice was licensing.” (American Conservative Union, p. 12)

“Through YouTube, Google profits directly from verbatim copies of Amici’s own works. These copies are often unauthorized, unlicensed, and severely undermonetized.” (Songwriters Guild of America, p. 26)

The argument that Google’s use was protected by exceptions to the copyright laws falls flat.

“This brazen commercial use in competition with [Oracle] and the indisputable harm to the market doom [Google’s] fair use claim.” (Copyright Thought Leaders, p. 21)

“Google’s verbatim copying of Oracle’s code for use in the Android platform had a measurable negative impact on Oracle’s bottom line. Under existing law…such use of another’s work is categorically not ‘fair.’” (Internet Accountability Project, p. 3)

“[Google] has done nothing that qualifies as transformative. [Google] engaged in verbatim copying to use the copied code in commercial competition with others who either licensed the works or avoided infringement by applying their own creativity to write different code to perform those functions.” (Copyright Thought Leaders, p. 20)

Google and many of its amici seek to upend [the] well-ordered system of private property rights in software through either an unworkably complex, nearly metaphysical, interpretation of copyrightability of software, or a broad “fair use” exemption, both based on some conjured up “special status” as players in the software industry.” (American Conservative Union, p. 4)

This case threatens copyright protection across the board.

Copyright is, in fact, of existential importance to…creators, who would be utterly lacking in market power and the ability to earn their livings without it.” (Songwriters Guild of America, p. 3)

“It is not empty rhetoric to say that without the statutory and constitutional protections of copyright, professional creators could not earn their livings and simply would not produce new works, and the world would be poorer for it. The reason is simple but profound: copyright protection allows for a vibrant creative environment in which artists can predictably recover the gains of their creative labors.” (Songwriters Guild of America, p. 5)

Contact Info
Deborah Hellinger
Oracle
+1 212-508-7935
deborah.hellinger@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

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Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

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Deborah Hellinger

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Oracle Cloud Applications Achieves FedRAMP Moderate Authorization

Wed, 2020-02-19 08:00
Press Release
Oracle Cloud Applications Achieves FedRAMP Moderate Authorization New authorization marks key milestone for the Federal Government, extending agency access to the suite of Oracle Cloud Applications covering ERP, HCM, and CX

Redwood Shores, Calif.—Feb 19, 2020

Oracle today announced that Oracle Cloud Applications has achieved FedRAMP Moderate Authorization. FedRAMP is a government-wide program that provides a standardized approach to security assessment, authorization, and continuous monitoring for cloud products and services. With this new authorization, U.S. Federal Government customers can benefit from Oracle’s complete and integrated suite of cloud applications for finance, human resources, supply chain, and customer experience.

To outpace accelerating change in technology, government agencies need to break down data silos, embrace the latest innovations, and improve digital experiences, collaboration, and service. Built on Oracle’s industry-leading cloud platform and infrastructure, Oracle Cloud Applications enables customers to benefit from best-in-class security, high-end scalability, and performance, in addition to strong integration capabilities.

“FedRAMP Authorization for Oracle Cloud Applications is a critical step in meeting the growing demands and compliance requirements of our public sector customers,” said Tamara Greenspan, group vice president, Oracle Public Sector. “By achieving this authorization, we are able to help the Federal Government tap into our complete and innovative cloud applications suite to not just keep pace, but stay ahead of the evolving business and technology landscape.”

Oracle has been a long-standing strategic technology partner of the U.S. Federal Government. In fact, a component of the U.S. Intelligence Community was the first customer to use Oracle’s flagship database software 35 years ago. Today, more than 500 government organizations take advantage of the superior performance of Oracle’s industry-leading technologies.

Contact Info
Celina Bertallee
Oracle
559-283-2425
celina.bertallee@oracle.com
About Oracle

The Oracle Cloud offers a complete suite of integrated applications for Sales, Service, Marketing, Human Resources, Finance, Supply Chain and Manufacturing, plus Highly Automated and Secure Generation 2 Infrastructure featuring the Oracle Autonomous Database. For more information about Oracle (NYSE: ORCL), please visit us at www.oracle.com.

Trademarks

Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Talk to a Press Contact

Celina Bertallee

  • 559-283-2425

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